How you Feel When You Are 6 Weeks Pregnant

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How you Feel When You Are 6 Weeks Pregnant

NOTE: This post contains affiliate links of Recommended products that when you purchase any product through the link provided, I will earn a commission at a no cost which will suport my work as a blogger to produce more educative posts like this one.

Please if the recommended products don’t cause any positive change in your life, I do advice you to see your personal doctor as soon as possibe.

6 Weeks Pregnant: Your Baby’s Development

Now that you’re six weeks pregnant, your little one is developing new features. This week’s most important milestone:

The neural tube begins to close over what will become your baby’s spinal cord.

There’s more! This week, the areas that will become the eyes and ears have started to project as bumps, and other tiny buds are forming that will eventually grow into arms and legs.

A tiny heartbeat of about 105 beats per minute may be detectable in an ultrasound this week, and the brain and nervous system are also developing quickly.

In fact, the nose, mouth, and inner and outer ears are just starting to take shape, along with the lungs.

In just a few weeks, breathing tubes will form between the throat and the lungs, getting ready for your little one’s first breath of air (and maybe a loud wail) at birth.

Wondering when you might be able to meet your baby?

Mom's Body at 6 Weeks Pregnant

This week, your breasts may feel tender or achy because of increased blood flow; this is a normal part of your body preparing for breastfeeding.

Wearing a supportive bra can help with discomfort.

You may also experience constipation because of an increase in progesterone, which slows down the digestive tract.

To deal with this, exercise regularly, eat a balanced diet with high-fiber foods, and drink plenty of water.

If you’ve been losing your lunch lately, you’re in good company!

As many as 85 percent of pregnant women experience some morning sickness, most frequently during the first trimester.

Nausea may be connected to increasing levels of hCG, the hormone your body produces when you are pregnant, as well as other hormonal changes.

Though you can’t prevent morning sickness, you can take some comfort in the fact that the symptoms usually subside after the first trimester.

6 Weeks Pregnant: Your Symptoms

Spotting It’s not unusual to see some spotting at six weeks, but it should be light, not even enough to cover a small pantyliner.

This implantation bleeding is normal, but if you see a lot of blood, if the spotting lasts longer than two days, or you have any concerns, be sure to see your doctor right away.

Cramping.

At six weeks pregnant, slight cramping can be normal.

It’s a sign your uterus and the surrounding tissues are expanding to make room for your baby.

If you feel pain more severe than usual period cramping, especially if accompanied by a fever or diarrhea, contact your doctor immediately.

Morning Sickness If you haven’t yet had morning sickness, this may be the week it arrives.

Morning sickness can happen any time of day or night.

It may be triggered by certain movements, smells, an empty stomach, or nothing at all.

Crackers and other simple, starchy foods can help, so keep a little something on hand for those random bouts of nausea.

Exhaustion You may feel completely exhausted due to pregnancy fatigue, and that’s OK.

As your levels of the pregnancy hormone progesterone are increasing, making you more and more tired, you may find taking naps can help;

some women also say that little snacks and some light exercise are effective in fighting off fatigue.

Be sure that you’re getting plenty of iron, because too little can cause anemia and lead to tiredness.

Frequent Urination It’s also normal to run to the bathroom more often than usual.

Your kidneys are working overtime to process the extra fluid in your body now.

Mood Swings You may be in for some emotional highs and lows between now and the end of your pregnancy.

Mood swings are common in the first trimester, often subside in the second, and sometimes return toward the end of the third trimester.

Eating well, chatting with friends, taking naps, and engaging in light exercise are some easy ways to help yourself feel a bit better.

No Symptoms That’s right, it’s possible to be six weeks pregnant with no symptoms whatsoever! Every pregnancy and every woman is different.

For example, some women never experience morning sickness, so if you’re one of the lucky few, enjoy these nausea-free days without worry.

6 Weeks Pregnant: Things to Consider

One of the first things you may notice early in your pregnancy is an increase in the size of your breasts, and the surge of pregnancy hormones you’re experiencing now may also lead to some skin changes, like an increase in oil production.

Your nipples may turn a shade or two darker thanks to hyperpigmentation.

Check out your closet to make sure you’ll have some stretchy or roomy clothing to wear during the coming weeks.

Your body will soon start to grow, and you’ll want to stay comfy even if you’re not yet ready to transition into maternity clothes.

You may want to avoid tight-fitting pants from this point on, and choose cotton underwear.

Also, don’t forget to increase your bra size when needed for your comfort.

It’s natural for there to be times when you have lots of concerns and when you feel overwhelmed.

If your mind is racing, write down your thoughts in a pregnancy journal – it might help you feel a little better.

You could also make a list of questions to share with your doctor.

This might help you feel a little more in control, as you’ll know that you’ll be able to get answers at your next prenatal visit.

Around this time, you may also want to start a week-by-week photo journal or a pregnancy scrapbook full of your notes, photos, and mementos, as a nice way to celebrate your pregnancy.

This is also a lovely keepsake you can share with your baby in a few years’ time.

Download our Pregnancy Guide, which has all the information you need to navigate the first trimester of your pregnancy and beyond.

Review your health insurance policies if you haven’t done so yet.

Your Baby at Week 6

Baby’s Head Takes Shape
You might be coping with full-blown pregnancy symptoms (poor girl), but there’s plenty of good news too.

The folds of tissue in the prominent bump on top — the head — are developing into your baby’s jaw, cheeks and chin, which will eventually become one adorable face.

And are those little indentations on both sides of the head the sweet dimples you always hoped your baby would inherit from your mom’s side of the family? No, they’re ear canals in the making.

Small dots on the face will form the eyes and button nose in a few weeks.

Also taking shape this week: her kidneys, liver and lungs, along with her little heart, which is now beating about 110 times a minute (and getting faster every day).

Your Body at Week 6

Frequent Urination
Your body may not yet have changed on the outside, but you’ll be reminded you’re 6 weeks pregnant every time you feel queasy or bloated or dive head-first into your sixth grapefruit of the day (funny, because you never craved grapefruit before).

Another clue? You’re in the bathroom more than you’re out of it.

Frequent urination is a symptom no pregnant woman enjoys (especially when it breaks up the sleep you really need right now) but it’s one of the most common symptoms of pregnancy, especially early on.

Why? For one thing, the pregnancy hormone hCG is causing an increase of blood flow to your pelvic area — good for increased sexual pleasure, not so good when you’re one hour into a two-hour movie at the theater.

What’s more, your kidneys are becoming more efficient at ridding your body of waste.

Add to that the fact that your growing uterus is beginning to push down on your bladder, leaving less storage space for urine — and you’ve got a perfect (pee) storm.

Luckily, this pressure is often relieved once the uterus rises into the abdominal cavity in the second trimester.

Here’s a quick tip: Lean forward when you pee to ensure that your bladder is completely emptied each time.

Then, when you think you’re done, pee again. This way, you might need fewer trips to the bathroom.

But don’t be tempted to cut back on liquids — your body needs a steady supply of fluids.

Heartburn & Indigestion
Here’s the not-so-great news — the chances of getting through the next nine months heartburn-free are nearly zero.

That’s because the muscle at the top of the stomach that usually prevents digestive juices from backing up relaxes.

But here’s better news: You can minimize the symptoms if you don’t rush through your meals and avoid clothes that constrict your belly.

Planning Your First Prenatal Visit
Sure, you already got the news from your home pregnancy test — but it doesn’t hurt to hear it confirmed by a doctor, one reason why you’re so psyched for that first practitioner visit.

Expect this first of many prenatal checkups to be exciting…and long.

You’ll have a thorough physical, including a pelvic exam, Pap smear (unless you’ve recently had one) and initial blood tests to determine your blood type, Rh factor, whether you’re iron-deficient and likely whether your baby is at risk for chromosomal abnormalities.

You’ll also be tested for sexually transmitted diseases, immunity to German measles (rubella) and ethnic-specific genetic diseases.

Plus you’ll need to pee into a cup (no problem with that — right?) so your urine can be tested for glucose, protein, red and white blood cells and bacteria.

One more thing: Be prepared to answer lots of questions (health histories can take a while), but more importantly, to ask some of your own (bring a list so you won’t forget any).

Wonder whether you and Joe (aka your beloved extra-foamy mocha cappuccino) will have to part ways now that you’re expecting? Why your chest suddenly resembles a map of an interstate highway? If your partner’s penis can poke the baby in the eye while you’re making love? Don’t just sit there — ask!

Remember no question is silly now.

While you’re at it, talk to your doctor about whether you should get noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) — a screening for chromosomal abnormalities recommended for some at-risk moms that’s given as early as week 9 of pregnancy.

6 Weeks Pregnant: Your Baby’s Development

Now that you’re six weeks pregnant, your little one is developing new features.

This week’s most important milestone: The neural tube begins to close over what will become your baby’s spinal cord.

There’s more! This week, the areas that will become the eyes and ears have started to project as bumps, and other tiny buds are forming that will eventually grow into arms and legs.

A tiny heartbeat of about 105 beats per minute may be detectable in an ultrasound this week, and the brain and nervous system are also developing quickly.

In fact, the nose, mouth, and inner and outer ears are just starting to take shape, along with the lungs.

In just a few weeks, breathing tubes will form between the throat and the lungs, getting ready for your little one’s first breath of air (and maybe a loud wail) at birth.

Wondering when you might be able to meet your baby?

Mom's Body at 6 Weeks Pregnant

This week, your breasts may feel tender or achy because of increased blood flow; this is a normal part of your body preparing for breastfeeding.

Wearing a supportive bra can help with discomfort.

You may also experience constipation because of an increase in progesterone, which slows down the digestive tract.

To deal with this, exercise regularly, eat a balanced diet with high-fiber foods, and drink plenty of water.

If you’ve been losing your lunch lately, you’re in good company!

As many as 85 percent of pregnant women experience some morning sickness, most frequently during the first trimester.

Nausea may be connected to increasing levels of hCG, the hormone your body produces when you are pregnant, as well as other hormonal changes.

Though you can’t prevent morning sickness, you can take some comfort in the fact that the symptoms usually subside after the first trimester.

6 Weeks Pregnant: Your Symptoms

Spotting It’s not unusual to see some spotting at six weeks, but it should be light, not even enough to cover a small pantyliner.

This implantation bleeding is normal, but if you see a lot of blood, if the spotting lasts longer than two days, or you have any concerns, be sure to see your doctor right away.

Cramping.

At six weeks pregnant, slight cramping can be normal.

It’s a sign your uterus and the surrounding tissues are expanding to make room for your baby.

If you feel pain more severe than usual period cramping, especially if accompanied by a fever or diarrhea, contact your doctor immediately.

Morning Sickness If you haven’t yet had morning sickness, this may be the week it arrives.

Morning sickness can happen any time of day or night.

It may be triggered by certain movements, smells, an empty stomach, or nothing at all.

Crackers and other simple, starchy foods can help, so keep a little something on hand for those random bouts of nausea.

Exhaustion You may feel completely exhausted due to pregnancy fatigue, and that’s OK.

As your levels of the pregnancy hormone progesterone are increasing, making you more and more tired, you may find taking naps can help; some women also say that little snacks and some light exercise are effective in fighting off fatigue.

Be sure that you’re getting plenty of iron, because too little can cause anemia and lead to tiredness.

Frequent Urination It’s also normal to run to the bathroom more often than usual.

Your kidneys are working overtime to process the extra fluid in your body now.

Mood Swings You may be in for some emotional highs and lows between now and the end of your pregnancy.

Mood swings are common in the first trimester, often subside in the second, and sometimes return toward the end of the third trimester.

Eating well, chatting with friends, taking naps, and engaging in light exercise are some easy ways to help yourself feel a bit better.

No Symptoms That’s right, it’s possible to be six weeks pregnant with no symptoms whatsoever!

Every pregnancy and every woman is different.

For example, some women never experience morning sickness, so if you’re one of the lucky few, enjoy these nausea-free days without worry.

6 Weeks Pregnant: Things to Consider

One of the first things you may notice early in your pregnancy is an increase in the size of your breasts, and the surge of pregnancy hormones you’re experiencing now may also lead to some skin changes, like an increase in oil production.

Your nipples may turn a shade or two darker thanks to hyperpigmentation.

Check out your closet to make sure you’ll have some stretchy or roomy clothing to wear during the coming weeks.

Your body will soon start to grow, and you’ll want to stay comfy even if you’re not yet ready to transition into maternity clothes.

You may want to avoid tight-fitting pants from this point on, and choose cotton underwear.

Also, don’t forget to increase your bra size when needed for your comfort.

It’s natural for there to be times when you have lots of concerns and when you feel overwhelmed.

If your mind is racing, write down your thoughts in a pregnancy journal – it might help you feel a little better.

You could also make a list of questions to share with your doctor.

This might help you feel a little more in control, as you’ll know that you’ll be able to get answers at your next prenatal visit.

Around this time, you may also want to start a week-by-week photo journal or a pregnancy scrapbook full of your notes, photos, and mementos, as a nice way to celebrate your pregnancy.

This is also a lovely keepsake you can share with your baby in a few years’ time.

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