How you Feel When You Are 5 Weeks Pregnant

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How you Feel When You Are 5 Weeks Pregnant

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4 WEEKS PREGNANT

Even though you’re just five weeks pregnant, lots of changes are taking place.

The placenta and the beginnings of the umbilical cord are developing in order to channel essential nutrients and oxygen from your body to the embryo.

These nutrients, like calcium, folic acid, and other vitamins, all play a vital role in healthy development.

This week, the neural tube continues to develop; it will eventually become the spinal column and the brain.

At this point, taking at least 400 micrograms of folic acid every day is a great way to support your baby’s healthy growth and development and reduce the risk of neural tube disorders.

Your baby’s heart will develop from what is now just a bulge in the middle of the embryo, and the heartbeat itself may be detected as early as the sixth week of pregnancy.

How Big Is Your Baby at 5 Weeks?

This week, your baby is still very small, but growing quickly! Picture a small orange seed or a grain of rice.

At this stage, your little one could be between 0.05 and 0.10 inches long, with a shape similar to that of a tiny tadpole.

Mom's Body at 5 Weeks Pregnant

How do you feel now that you’re actually pregnant? If you’ve been trying to conceive for a while, you’re probably ecstatic.

You may also find yourself wondering about all the changes in store and when you may be able to meet your little one.

5 Weeks Pregnant: Your Symptoms

Morning sickness.

Some women start to experience morning sickness at five weeks pregnant.

Unpleasant, nauseous feelings can happen in the morning, evening, or all day long, and many women will also throw up.

To deal with morning sickness, drink enough fluids to prevent dehydration and avoid any greasy, spicy, or fatty foods that may trigger your bouts of nausea.

Many women with morning sickness benefit from eating small meals and snacks frequently.
Light bleeding or spotting.

It’s common to see some spotting at five weeks pregnant, but there should be no more than a few drops of blood — not even enough to cover a small pantyliner.

This is likely just implantation bleeding, but you’ll want to mention it to your doctor so that he or she can rule out complications.

If you see a lot of blood, if the spotting lasts longer than two days, or you have any concerns, see your doctor right away.

Breast tenderness.

Around five weeks pregnant, a surge of hormones might cause your breasts to ache as they continue to stretch and grow in preparation for breastfeeding.

Frequent urination.

The urgent need to pee can strike any time, especially as your kidneys are starting to have extra fluid to process, thanks to the increasing volume of blood in your body.

Although this symptom can be annoying, it’s also completely normal.

Fatigue. Don’t be surprised if you feel completely wiped out.

Your body is dealing with an increase in levels of progesterone, which can leave you feeling more tired than usual.

Avoiding caffeine and vigorous activity before bed can help you sleep better at night.

Try to keep your daily schedule regular, but also try not to overschedule yourself.

It’s important to find a healthy balance between your daily activities and rest time.

And don’t feel guilty about taking time to rest or nap when you need it.

You’ll be doing yourself and your little one a big favor by getting as much rest as you can now.
Mood swings.

Happy one moment, crying the next? Mood swings are common when you’re pregnant, and for some women they feel like PMS at its worst.

It may help to find some ways to distract yourself when an unpleasant mood interferes with your normal routine.

Try going for a walk or listening to music, for example.
Mild or no symptoms

What if, at five weeks pregnant, you are symptom-free? It’s not unusual for women to feel and look completely normal at this stage, or for certain symptoms to come and go.

As for that five weeks pregnant belly, it may appear unchanged, or it may be looking and feeling bloated.

If you’ve got severe morning sickness, you may even lose a little bit of weight during the first trimester.

Be sure to talk to your healthcare provider if you have questions about the changes that are taking place, or if the lack of any symptoms has you feeling uneasy.

5 Weeks Pregnant: Things to Consider

Give some thought to what you’re eating, making sure that you’re consuming a variety of healthy foods.

Avoid fish that could contain high levels of mercury — like shark, swordfish, and mackerel — and skip any food that’s uncooked or unpasteurized.

You’ll also want to avoid things like sushi made with raw fish and oysters, as well as soft cheeses like Brie and feta.

These items can cause food-borne illnesses that can affect you and your little one.

Curious about other early signs and symptoms of pregnancy? Try our Early Signs of Pregnancy quiz to learn more.

Think about whether to share the news that you’re five weeks along.

Some people prefer to wait until the end of the first trimester when the risk of miscarriage drops significantly.

Others tell at least a select few the moment they’ve got a positive pregnancy test in hand.

Have a cat? Now is the time to get someone else to take care of the litter box so that you can stay clear of toxoplasmosis, an infection that can harm unborn babies.

Download our Pregnancy Guide to learn more about what to look forward to over the coming weeks and months.

Our guide covers everything from nutrition and weight gain to all the questions you’ll want to ask your healthcare provider.

5 WEEKS PREGNANT

You’ve just been initiated to the pregnancy club!

Week 5 is a common time for moms-to-be to find out they’re pregnant.

That’s because by now you’ve probably realized you’ve missed your period and then thought, Whoa… maybe I should take a test!

Plus, at 5 weeks pregnant, heightened hormone levels may be giving you symptoms that are tough to ignore, like sore breasts, nausea, and fatigue.

(Those same hormones are the ones your pregnancy test detected to give you a positive result.) Okay, so the “club” might not be so fun right now, but you’ll eventually be so glad you were a member.

Just give it, oh, about eight more months.

How Big Is Baby at 5 Weeks Pregnant?

At 5 weeks pregnant, baby is the size of an apple seed.

Yep, your embryo is now measurable—though at week five of pregnancy, it’s a wee 0.13 inches from crown to rump (a.k.a. head to bum)—and baby’s gearing up for much more growth.

In fact, in the next week, he or she will almost double in size. Grow, baby, grow!

5 Weeks Pregnant Is How Many Months?

5 weeks pregnant is about one month pregnant.

Yep, you just discovered you’re pregnant and you’ve already got one month in the books.

That’s because most doctors start counting pregnancy from the first day of your last period.

Only eight months to go!

5 WEEKS PREGNANT SYMPTOMS

The pregnancy symptoms you feel at five weeks are just the beginning of the slew of changes your body is about to go through.

No need to dread the entire pregnancy based on what’s happening right now: many moms-to-be say the first trimester is the toughest, so think of it as getting the rough stuff out of the way early.

In the meantime, take care of yourself and get plenty of rest, eat right, and figure out ways to help yourself feel better.

If you’re wondering what to expect at 5 weeks pregnant, here’s what’s most common:

Sore breasts. Morning sickness gets all the attention, but aching boobs may actually be the most common symptom at 5 weeks pregnant.

Morning sickness.

This bad boy is so inaccurately named.

Nausea in early pregnancy can happen at any time of the day, not just morning.

And unfortunately, some pregnant moms feel queasy pretty much all day.

In fact, if you’re 5 weeks pregnant with twins, you may be more likely to have severe morning sickness.

Experiment with different strategies to find what helps you deal with the queasies best.

Eating small, frequent meals is one good one.

You might also try Vitamin B6, ginger capsules, special nausea-reducing lozenges or lollipops, and acupressure wristbands.
Fatigue.

At 5 weeks pregnant, it’s normal to want to nap in the middle of a board meeting, a dinner date, a… well, pretty much any time.

You’re zapped from making a baby and there’s not much you can do about it except get some extra rest, do some light exercise, and eat every few hours so your blood sugar doesn’t drop so much that you lose even more of your (already scarce) energy.

Frequent urination. You might notice yourself having the urge to pee more often early in pregnancy.

This symptom at 5 weeks pregnant is because your kidneys are actually expanding. (Whoa!)

Cramps.

Around 4 or 5 weeks, cramping could be a sign the embryo has implanted nicely into the lining of your uterus.

Or it could be a sign your uterus is expanding and stretching your ligaments.

If you’re feeling cramping at 5 weeks pregnant that’s severe or painful, call your doctor and get checked out to make sure it’s not a sign of a problem.

Spotting. When you’re 5 weeks pregnant spotting can seem scary, but a little blood on your underwear could also be a sign of implantation.

You might also spot a bit after sex, since your cervix is more sensitive now that you’re pregnant.

This is totally normal, but if you’re having something that’s less like spotting and more like bleeding at 5 weeks pregnant—or really, if you’re concerned at all—call the doctor.

Some moms-to-be who are 5 weeks pregnant feel no symptoms at all.

Or it might feel like, at 5 weeks pregnant, symptoms come and go. And all of that is totally okay!

Just because you’re not feeling sick or sore doesn’t mean there’s something wrong with the pregnancy.

It just means you’re lucky!

5 WEEKS PREGNANT BELLY

At 5 weeks pregnant, your belly may look unchanged—or you may be a bit bloated or feel like you’ve already gained a pound.

Heck, you might feel so sick that you can’t eat and worry you could have lost a pound.

All those scenarios are considered perfectly normal and totally okay! All pregnant women are different and how their bodies change throughout pregnancy varies widely.

You’re probably starting to wonder a bit about overall pregnancy weight gain.

The short answer is: You don’t need to worry too much about it yet.

Doctors only recommend gaining a few pounds (1 to 5 to be exact) during the first trimester (which ends after week 13), and that will probably happen without you thinking too much about it.

The long answer is that you will need to gain weight.

Your doctor will discuss personalized weight gain recommendations with you—know that they vary based on body type.

Here’s what the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recommends:

If you’re underweight (BMI under 18.5):

Your recommended total pregnancy weight gain is 28 to 40 pounds.

In the second and third trimesters, aim to gain about a pound (1 to 1.3 pounds to be exact) per week.

If you’re of average weight (BMI of 18.5 to 24.9):

Your recommended total pregnancy weight gain is 25 to 35 pounds.

In the second and third trimesters, aim to gain about a pound or a little less (0.8 to 1 pound to be exact) per week.

If you’re overweight (BMI of 25 to 29.9):

Your recommended total pregnancy weight gain is 15 to 25 pounds.

In the second and third trimesters, aim to gain a little over a half pound (0.5 to 0.7 pound to be exact) per week.

If you’re obese (BMI of 30 and above):

Your recommended total pregnancy weight gain is 11 to 20 pounds.

In the second and third trimesters, aim to gain about a half pound (0.4 to 0.6 pound to be exact) per week.

If you’re 5 weeks pregnant with twins:

Your recommended total pregnancy weight gain is 37 to 54 pounds.

In the first half of pregnancy, aim to gain about a pound per week.

In the second half, gain a little over a pound per week.

Wondering if you could be 5 weeks pregnant with twins?

If you were, you probably wouldn’t know it yet, though as we mentioned above, some twin moms swear they had worse morning sickness.

They also may gain weight more rapidly and “start to show” earlier than women having one baby would.

5 weeks pregnant is a good time ask your partner for a massage.

You might not have a big bump, but at five weeks pregnant, your body is working fast and furiously to grow baby, so you deserve a little TLC, right?

5 WEEKS PREGNANT ULTRASOUND

Your week-5 embryo doesn’t look like much more than a tadpole right now, but he or she’s already starting to form major organs—heart, stomach, liver, and kidneys—and systems—digestive, circulatory, and nervous).

If you don’t have a medical history that puts you at higher risk for pregnancy complications, you won’t likely have a 5 weeks pregnant ultrasound.

Instead, your OB will probably have you make an appointment for your first prenatal visit around week 8 or 9.

And you’ll just have to wait impatiently. We feel your pain—sorry!

When you do have your first ultrasound, the doctor or technician will measure baby from crown to rump and could adjust your due date based on baby’s size (which would change which week of pregnancy you’re in).

You’ll have a slew of blood tests and urine tests to be sure you and baby are both doing fine.

So while you’re totally amped up to see baby’s tiny fluttering heartbeat on the ultrasound screen, remind yourself that you can wait a few weeks for the blood draws and peeing in a cup. Welcome to the club!

Baby Has a Tail

So what does your little embryo — already the size of an orange seed — look like now? Actually, not unlike a tadpole, with a rudimentary head and a tail.

But don’t worry, there’s no frog in your future. In fact, you’re fewer than eight months away from holding a real prince (or princess) in your arms.

While all this is happening, your hCG hormone levels in your body are now high enough to confirm that you’re expecting using a home pregnancy test.

5 Weeks Pregnant Is How Many Months?

If you’re 5 weeks pregnant, you’re in month 2 of your pregnancy.

It takes a lot of developing to become a baby — all the major and minor bodily systems (digestive, circulatory, nervous and so on) and organs (heart, lungs, stomach) have to form from scratch.

The first system to be operational is the circulatory system, or blood — along with its companion organ, the heart, which you may even be able to see beating on an early ultrasound, though it’s more commonly visible at week 6 or 7.

When you’re 5 weeks pregnant, your baby’s heart is made up of two tiny channels called heart tubes and they’re already hard at work.

When those tubes fuse together, your baby will have a fully functioning heart, though he almost certainly has his grip on yours already!

Also in the works this week are several other organs, including the neural tube — the precursor to your baby’s brain and spinal cord — which hasn’t yet sealed.

But by next week, that open-door policy is over.

Your Body at Week 5

hCG and Home Pregnancy Tests
By now you should have missed your period — one of the more obvious indications that you’re pregnant.

It’s time to pee on a stick (good news since you probably need to go more often anyway), because at 5 weeks pregnant the level of hCG (the pregnancy-announcer hormone) in your urine is high enough to be detected by a home pregnancy test.

That means you’ll be able to confirm what you probably already suspect: You’re expecting!

This news will probably elicit a combo platter of emotions ranging from sheer joy to sheer terror as the reality that you’re going to be a mom sets in.

Mood swings are totally normal (kind of like PMS on overdrive), so don’t worry if you’re having them.

Early Pregnancy Signs
There’ll be other early pregnancy signs, too.

Like that sense of exhaustion that may have washed over you.

And those tender breasts. Or that slight bout of nausea you might have felt when you smelled a dish that normally doesn’t bother you.

Growing a baby — even one no larger than an orange seed — is hard work, and your body is responding in kind.

Pregnancy Hormones Kick In
Large quantities of hormones — chemical signals that circulate in your body and work together to cause physical changes — are being mass-produced this week.

Among them are estrogen to keep the levels of progesterone and hCG up where they need to be, progesterone to maintain the function of the placenta, keep the smooth muscles of the uterus from contracting and stimulate breast tissue growth, and hCG to support the corpus luteum, which nourishes baby until the placenta takes over at about 10 weeks and regulates the amount of progesterone necessary.

And don’t be surprised if you feel like these hormones are taking over your life sometimes!

Telling Your Friends You’re Pregnant
Have you or your partner been bursting to spread the good news about your expectant status ever since that home pregnancy test turned positive?

Not sure when the best time is to grab a megaphone (or a telephone … or a computer keyboard) and start sharing? Only the two of you can make the call, so to speak, on that one.

Some couples can’t wait to tell their friends they’re pregnant (if they could, they’d shout it from the highest mountain — or make the announcement go viral), while others prefer to keep their happy news on the D.L.

until after the third month, when the risk of miscarriage greatly decreases.

Still others wish that they could stay mum about becoming a mom (and dad) but can’t help blabbing the first chance they get.

Talk it over together, and remember, it’s your little secret for as long as you choose.

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